gypsum

   1. White or colorless mineral or rock composed of the hydrated calcium sulfate, CaSO4●2H2O. Gypsum rock is an evaporite precipitated from sea water and is therefore soluble in water and may contain dissolutional caves. Mineral gypsum is formed in some caves by reactions between the host limestone and sulfates (including sulphuric acid) derived from oxidized sulfide minerals (see pyrite). Gypsum, also referred to as selenite, commonly occurs as transparent crystals, blades, needles or fibres in cave clay deposits. A more spectacular form is as fibrous or curved crystals that may develop into cave flowers on cave walls and ceilings, as for example in parts of the Flint Mammoth Cave System, USA, or grow into large, hanging chandeliers, as in Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico [9].
   2. A mineral composed of hydrous calcium sulfate [10], CaSO4●2H20.

A Lexicon of Cave and Karst Terminology with Special Reference to Environmental Karst Hydrology. . 2002.

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  • Gypsum — ist eine Bezeichnung für Gips Orte in den Vereinigten Staaten: Gypsum (Colorado) Gypsum (Kansas) Gypsum (Ohio) Gypsum Township (Kansas) Gypsum Creek Township (Kansas) Diese Seite ist eine …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Gypsum — Gypsum, CO U.S. town in Colorado Population (2000): 3654 Housing Units (2000): 1210 Land area (2000): 3.680365 sq. miles (9.532101 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.680365 sq. miles (9.532101 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Gypsum, CO — U.S. town in Colorado Population (2000): 3654 Housing Units (2000): 1210 Land area (2000): 3.680365 sq. miles (9.532101 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.680365 sq. miles (9.532101 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Gypsum, KS — U.S. city in Kansas Population (2000): 414 Housing Units (2000): 179 Land area (2000): 0.432824 sq. miles (1.121009 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.432824 sq. miles (1.121009 sq. km) FIPS code …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Gypsum — Gyp sum (j[i^]p s[u^]m), n. [L. gypsum, Gr. gy psos; cf. Ar. jibs plaster, mortar, Per. jabs[imac]n lime.] (Min.) A mineral consisting of the hydrous sulphate of lime (calcium). When calcined, it forms plaster of Paris. {Selenite} is a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • GYPSUM — Graec. γυψος, quasi γῆ ἑψηθεῖσα, terra cocta, cognata calci res est, Plin. l. 36. c. 24. Plura eius genera, nam et e lapide coquitur, ut in Syria ac Thuriis: et e terra foditur, ut in Cypro ac Perrhpebis: e summa tellure et Tymphaicum est. Qui… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • gypsum — substance (hydrated calcium sulphate) used in making plaster, late 14c., from L. gypsum, from Gk. gypsos chalk, according to Klein, perhaps of Semitic origin (Cf. Arabic jibs, Hebrew gephes plaster ) …   Etymology dictionary

  • gypsum — [jip′səm] n. [ME < L < Gr gypsos, chalk, gypsum < Sem] a very soft, monoclinic mineral, CaSO4·2H2O, commonly found with other evaporites in sedimentary rock and used to make plaster of Paris and cement; hydrous calcium sulfate: see MOHS… …   English World dictionary

  • gypsum — ► NOUN ▪ a soft white or grey mineral used to make plaster of Paris and in the building industry. ORIGIN Latin, from Greek gupsos chalk …   English terms dictionary

  • Gypsum — Infobox mineral name = Gypsum category = Mineral boxwidth = boxbgcolor = caption = Desert rose, 10 cm long formula = Calcium Sulfate CaSO4·2H2O molweight = color = White to grey, pinkish red habit = Massive, flat. Elongated and generally… …   Wikipedia

  • gypsum — /jip seuhm/, n. a very common mineral, hydrated calcium sulfate, CaSO4·2H2O, occurring in crystals and in masses, soft enough to be scratched by the fingernail: used to make plaster of Paris, as an ornamental material, as a fertilizer, etc. [1640 …   Universalium

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